New publication--participatory mapping and PGIS in archaeology and cultural landscapes

GG
Gregory Gordon Brown
Mon, Aug 13, 2018 7:16 PM

This new paper reviews PMapping and PGIS significance in archaeology and cultural landscapes in the global south.

Alina Álvarez Larrain; and Michael K McCall (2018)

Participatory mapping and participatory GIS (PGIS) for archaeological and cultural landscapes studies: a review.

J. of  Archaeological Theory & Method  (2018)  1-36.  DOI: 10.1007/s10816-018-9385-z

Abstract: Participatory mapping and PGIS approaches as appropriate developing community-based spatial studies in archaeology: Researchers and practitioners who advocate reflexive mapping practices recognize that mapping is not an objective practice and that maps are necessarily the product of those who create them. A PM/PGIS approach can contribute to this reflexive practice through the incorporation of local spatial knowledge which is place-based and reflects a long close physical interaction with the landscape. For local communities, this approach helps them be incorporated as active subjects in the registration and interpretation of their cultural heritage and in its defence and management. Archaeological studies are enriched by incorporating contemporary perspectives and local people's knowledge into interpretations of past landscapes. The paper reviews a range of PM/PGIS techniques as they are used in many case studies of archaeological and historical accounts working with local people's knowledge.

--
Michael Keith McCall
Investigador Titular / Senior Researcher
CIGA-UNAM
Morelia, Michoacan, Mexico

This new paper reviews PMapping and PGIS significance in archaeology and cultural landscapes in the global south. Alina Álvarez Larrain; and Michael K McCall (2018) Participatory mapping and participatory GIS (PGIS) for archaeological and cultural landscapes studies: a review. J. of Archaeological Theory & Method (2018) 1-36. DOI: 10.1007/s10816-018-9385-z Abstract: Participatory mapping and PGIS approaches as appropriate developing community-based spatial studies in archaeology: Researchers and practitioners who advocate reflexive mapping practices recognize that mapping is not an objective practice and that maps are necessarily the product of those who create them. A PM/PGIS approach can contribute to this reflexive practice through the incorporation of local spatial knowledge which is place-based and reflects a long close physical interaction with the landscape. For local communities, this approach helps them be incorporated as active subjects in the registration and interpretation of their cultural heritage and in its defence and management. Archaeological studies are enriched by incorporating contemporary perspectives and local people's knowledge into interpretations of past landscapes. The paper reviews a range of PM/PGIS techniques as they are used in many case studies of archaeological and historical accounts working with local people's knowledge. -- Michael Keith McCall Investigador Titular / Senior Researcher CIGA-UNAM Morelia, Michoacan, Mexico