Another new publication

GG
Gregory Gordon Brown
Wed, Oct 24, 2018 5:04 PM

Hi all,

See information below about another new publication.

--
Greg Brown (ggbrown@calpoly.edu)
Professor and Department Head
Natural Resource Management & Environmental Sciences
California Polytechnic State University

Visit the Landscape Values & PPGIS Institute (www.landscapevalues.orghttp://www.landscapevalues.org)

From: Angela Rout Angela.Rout@ucalgary.ca
Sent: Wednesday, October 24, 2018 9:37 AM
To: Gregory Gordon Brown ggbrown@calpoly.edu
Subject: New PPGIS publication

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0143622818304132

Using personal smartphone location histories in public engagement: Locating a new campus amenity
Abstract

Selecting a location for a new amenity can be a 'wicked problem' in planning engagement processes, involving multiple contradicting criteria. Recently available data sources generated by personal devices such as smartphones may be able to help. Planners are often required to incorporate public engagement methods when making urban planninghttps://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/earth-and-planetary-sciences/urban-planning decisions. Ideally, such decisions will be informed by evidence of how relevant public spaces are used. Researchers have speculated that smartphone location data, which can be mapped to show the use of space, might be useful for such purposes, however, it is not obvious whether non-experts will trust location data enough to use it. Our objective is to investigate whether non-experts use these data in an urban planning scenario by empirically measuring the influence of personal smartphone location histories on a location selection. Using an experimental simulation of an engagement scenario with 48 participants, and two manipulated factors (data presentation format and group size) we ask: do students use smartphone location data when locating a new campus amenity and how were the data used? We utilized regression analysishttps://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/earth-and-planetary-sciences/regression-analysis to assess changes in location selection after viewing data and compared these results to a qualitative post-study interview. Our data demonstrated a plausible change in location selection after viewing maps of smartphone location data. In addition, groups using a digital interactive surface discussed the data while those using paperhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/earth-and-planetary-sciences/paper-material did not. We also found that, when asked to make a final location selection, participants combined the data with previously held values (such as centrality). We conclude that those researching and leading planning decisions, such as locating a new amenity, should invest in incorporating smartphone data where it can provide empirical support for public engagement decisions.

[https://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/S01436228.gif]https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0143622818304132

Using personal smartphone location histories in public engagement: Locating a new campus amenityhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0143622818304132
www.sciencedirect.comhttp://www.sciencedirect.com
Selecting a location for a new amenity can be a 'wicked problem' in planning engagement processes, involving multiple contradicting criteria. Recently...

Angela Rout

PhD Candidate, Faculty of Science

Computational Media Design

University of Calgary

angela.rout@ucalgary.camailto:angela.rout@ucalgary.ca

(403)830-9767

Hi all, See information below about another new publication. -- Greg Brown (ggbrown@calpoly.edu) Professor and Department Head Natural Resource Management & Environmental Sciences California Polytechnic State University Visit the Landscape Values & PPGIS Institute (www.landscapevalues.org<http://www.landscapevalues.org>) From: Angela Rout <Angela.Rout@ucalgary.ca> Sent: Wednesday, October 24, 2018 9:37 AM To: Gregory Gordon Brown <ggbrown@calpoly.edu> Subject: New PPGIS publication https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0143622818304132 Using personal smartphone location histories in public engagement: Locating a new campus amenity Abstract Selecting a location for a new amenity can be a 'wicked problem' in planning engagement processes, involving multiple contradicting criteria. Recently available data sources generated by personal devices such as smartphones may be able to help. Planners are often required to incorporate public engagement methods when making urban planning<https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/earth-and-planetary-sciences/urban-planning> decisions. Ideally, such decisions will be informed by evidence of how relevant public spaces are used. Researchers have speculated that smartphone location data, which can be mapped to show the use of space, might be useful for such purposes, however, it is not obvious whether non-experts will trust location data enough to use it. Our objective is to investigate whether non-experts use these data in an urban planning scenario by empirically measuring the influence of personal smartphone location histories on a location selection. Using an experimental simulation of an engagement scenario with 48 participants, and two manipulated factors (data presentation format and group size) we ask: do students use smartphone location data when locating a new campus amenity and how were the data used? We utilized regression analysis<https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/earth-and-planetary-sciences/regression-analysis> to assess changes in location selection after viewing data and compared these results to a qualitative post-study interview. Our data demonstrated a plausible change in location selection after viewing maps of smartphone location data. In addition, groups using a digital interactive surface discussed the data while those using paper<https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/earth-and-planetary-sciences/paper-material> did not. We also found that, when asked to make a final location selection, participants combined the data with previously held values (such as centrality). We conclude that those researching and leading planning decisions, such as locating a new amenity, should invest in incorporating smartphone data where it can provide empirical support for public engagement decisions. [https://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/S01436228.gif]<https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0143622818304132> Using personal smartphone location histories in public engagement: Locating a new campus amenity<https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0143622818304132> www.sciencedirect.com<http://www.sciencedirect.com> Selecting a location for a new amenity can be a 'wicked problem' in planning engagement processes, involving multiple contradicting criteria. Recently... Angela Rout PhD Candidate, Faculty of Science Computational Media Design University of Calgary angela.rout@ucalgary.ca<mailto:angela.rout@ucalgary.ca> (403)830-9767